“Repeat offenders now face being named and shamed and a new offence for breaching bail will be legislated under reforms that will strengthen our youth justice system” Premier Campbell Newman told bmag.

Repeat offenders – changes will see them named and shamed!

“People have made it clear they are sick of the revolving door for repeat offenders, and our reforms are seen as tough – but necessary. In the past year, 400 young people have been charged with more than 7,000 offences while on bail. That is unacceptable and we have to turn it around.

“Under the changes, the identities of repeat offenders will be allowed to be published, making them more accountable for their actions and setting a strong deterrent for further offending. We all understand kids can make mistakes and that’s why we are still giving them a chance to clean up their act

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Jarrod Bleijie said the community had told the Newman Government loud and clear it was sick of the revolving door of repeat offending.

“Our reforms are tough but necessary,” Mr Bleijie said

“Under these reforms, the identities of repeat offenders will be allowed to be published, making them more accountable for their actions and setting a strong deterrent for further offending.

“Some reporting restrictions will remain. Publishing the identities of first time offenders will continue to be prohibited and the Court will have the discretion to close certain proceedings.

“Kids can make mistakes. That’s why we are still giving them a chance to clean up their act but there should be consequences if they don’t learn their lesson.

“We are balancing the scales of justice by making repeat offenders more accountable but allowing first time offenders to get back on the straight and narrow.

 

Do you think young offenders should be named and shames? Share your thoughts in our comment box below.

So, I’m wondering, could there be a conflict of interest between the state and federal governments regarding these controversial Queensland legal changes that will affect our minors – and, more particularly our Indigenous youth? And, would the proposed new laws breach the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child*?  Dr C M Tilley, Paddington