Australian Navel oranges are at their sweetest from now until September and, packing a powerful dose of vitamin C, they are a healthy and tasty addition to hearty winter dishes like this one.

Why oranges are good for you

You probably already know that Australian oranges are packed full of vitamin C and, in fact, one orange has almost twice the recommended daily Vitamin C intake. However, there are many more reasons to eat oranges. For example, citrus fruits have the highest antioxidant activity of all fruits, helping to boost the immune system and protect against cancer and heart disease.

Antioxidants also help maintain brain function and keep bones and joints in tip top shape as we get older.

Oranges are high in folic acid with one orange providing 18 percent of the recommended daily intake. They are also high in dietary fibre and help prevent bowel problems, improve cholesterol
levels and are naturally sweet while being low in kilojoules.

Ingredients:

Serves 4

  • 800g lamb shoulder, diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • 3 teaspoons fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 teaspoon sambal oelek (or red chilli paste)
  • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • Freshly squeezed juice of 2 Australian
  • Navel oranges
  • 400-600ml vegetable stock
  • 400g can chickpeas, drained and well rinsed
  • 2 Australian Navel oranges, segmented
  • Salt
  • 1 tablespoon pine nuts, toasted
  • 1 tablespoon coriander leaves

Method:

Place meat and oil in a large heavy-based saucepan. Add onion, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, star anise, cumin, sambal oelek and toss together over medium heat. Pour in orange juice and 400ml of stock (a little more liquid may be added later).

Bring to the boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Stir through chickpeas and cook for a further 15-30 minutes or until meat is tender. Gently stir through orange segments and season with salt.

Serve in a traditional tagine dish (like the one pictured). Sprinkle with pine nuts and coriander before serving.